Resource id #3DrugId:1d00000012resource(4) of type (mysql result) Drug Search

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Drug ID: 1d00000012

Drug Name: Aceclofenac

Generic Names: Acen-P | Softidol | Alnase | Acepain SP | Dolochek | Afesan SP | Aarther-P | Dolowin Gel | Xmoflam-SP | Healarace | Acelette -P | Valdone BCD | IBU -C Forte | Dolokind AA | Acent Gel | Thiolex A | Nanoforte | Acifon SP | Seramat -A | Pace (100mg) | Octane Plus | Acenez (150mg) | Steclo SR (200mg) | Acent TZ | Paindol SR | Acota 3 | Acepal | Zynac -SR | Painout (100mg) | Acmo P | Acebel-P | Acecloben | Aclo | More

Category: Anti- Inflammatory Agents

Legal Status: Non Opioid Prescription only drug


Indication for Mother: Category N:
Not yet classified.

Recommended Dose: The recommended dose is 100 mg twice daily.

Recommended In: This medication is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), prescribed for fever, pain, ankylosing spondylitis and arthritis. It blocks the action of a substance in the body (cyclo-oxygenase), which may cause pain, swelling and inflammation.

Directions For Use: It comes as a tablet to take by mouth, with food.

Storage: Store it in an airtight container in a cool dry place. Protect from light.

Dosage Forms: Tablet |

Side Effects: Diarrhea, nausea, headache, indigestion, heartburn, abdominal pain, flatulence, feeling sick, dizziness and rash.

In Case of Overdose: Symptoms include headache, nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, gastrointestinal irritation, gastrointestinal bleeding, rarely diarrhoea, disorientation, excitation, coma, drowsiness, dizziness, tinnitus, hypotension, respiratory depression, fainting, occasionally convulsions. In cases of significant poisoning acute renal failure and liver damage are possible.

Patients should be treated symptomatically as required. Within one hour of ingestion of a potentially toxic amount, activated charcoal should be considered. Alternatively, in adults, gastric lavage should be considered within one hour of ingestion of a potentially life-threatening overdose.

Specific therapies such as dialysis or haemoperfusion are probably of no help in eliminating NSAIDs due to their high rate of protein binding and extensive metabolism. Good urine output should be ensured.

Renal and liver function should be closely monitored. Patients should be observed for at least four hours after ingestion of potentially toxic amounts. In case of frequent or prolonged convulsions, patients should be treated with intravenous diazepam. Other measures may be indicated by the patient's clinical condition.

Management of acute poisoning with NSAIDs essentially consists of supportive and symptomatic measures.

Avoid If: Caution should be exercised in patients with history of Crohn's disease, bruising, heart, liver, or kidney disease, gastrointestinal disease, blood clotting problems, systemic lupus erythematosus, elderly, during pregnancy, alcohol-dependent patients, and breastfeeding.

It may cause dizziness or drowsiness, do not drive a car or operate machinery while taking this medication.

Drug Interaction: Other analgesics including cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors: Avoid concomitant use of two or more NSAIDs (including aspirin) as this may increase the risk of adverse effects.

Anti-hypertensives: Reduced anti-hypertensive effect.

Diuretics: Reduced diuretic effect. Diuretics can increase the risk of nephrotoxicity of NSAIDs. Although it was not shown to affect blood pressure control when co-administered with bendrofluazide, interactions with other diuretics cannot be ruled out. When concomitant administration with potassium-sparing diuretics is employed, serum potassium should be monitored.

Cardiac glycosides: NSAIDs may exacerbate cardiac failure, reduce GFR (glomerular filtration rate) and increase plasma glycoside levels.
Lithium: Decreased elimination of lithium.

Methotrexate: Decreased elimination of methotrexate. Caution should be exercised if NSAIDs and methotrexate are administered within 24 hours of each other, since NSAIDs may increase plasma levels, resulting in increased toxicity.

Ciclosporin: Increased risk of nephrotoxicity.

Mifepristone: NSAIDs should not be used for 8-12 days after mifepristone administration as NSAIDs can reduce the effect of mifepristone.

Corticosteroids: Increased risk of gastrointestinal ulceration or bleeding.

Anti-coagulants: NSAIDs may enhance the effects of anti-coagulants, such as warfarin. Close monitoring of patients on combined anti-coagulants and Aceclofenac Tablets therapy should be undertaken.

Quinolone antibiotics: Animal data indicate that NSAIDs can increase the risk of convulsions associated with quinolone antibiotics. Patients taking NSAIDs and quinolones may have an increased risk of developing convulsions.

Anti-platelet agents and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs): Increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding.

Tacrolimus: Possible increased risk of nephrotoxicity when NSAIDs are given with tacrolimus.

Zidovudine: Increased risk of haematological toxicity when NSAIDs are given with zidovudine. There is evidence of an increased risk of haemarthroses and haematoma in HIV(+) haemophiliacs receiving concurrent treatment with zidovudine and ibuprofen.

Antidiabetic agents: Clinical studies have shown that diclofenac can be given together with oral antidiabetic agents without influencing their clinical effect. However, there have been isolated reports of hypoglycaemic and hyperglycaemic effects. Thus with Aceclofenac Tablets, consideration should be given to adjustment of the dosage of hypoglycaemic agents.

Other NSAIDs: Concomitant therapy with aspirin or other NSAIDs may increase the frequency of adverse reactions, including the risk of GI bleeding.

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